Medicinal herbs - Chestnut
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Herb name: Chestnut, Castanea sativa

herbs - chestnut

Family: Fagaceae

Useful plant parts: Fruit, leaves and flowers.

Description: Chestnut is a medicinal herb which one can recognize with ease; it is known to have leaves which are made up from several smaller parts, and it produces a characteristic fruit which is enveloped in a thorny shell. Chestnuts bloom during May, while the fruit ripens in fall. Chestnuts come from the central part of the Balkans, and from there it has been gradually introduced to other parts of the world as well.

Certain mushroom species are known to grow often near chestnuts: Amanita caesarea, Boletus aereus, Leccinum griseum, Lentinula edodes (shiitake), Russula emetica, Russula heterophylla and many other.

   

Collecting period and locations: As we already mentioned, the fruit of the chestnut ripens in the fall, and then they can be collected; there are various techniques which can help one collect the seeds faster, however, using a simple wooden stick may already be helpful. Chestnuts can be found in most deciduous forests in Europe. Similar species can be found on other continents as well.

Medicinal properties and applications: Tincture made from certain parts of this plant is known to be an effective way of treating hemorrhoids. It generally has a positive effect on the whole cardiovascular system, especially on veins. It is known to help in water excretion. Chestnuts also have an anti-inflammatory effect.

   

Active compounds: Saponins, tannins, flavones, glycosides, phytosterols and various vitamins.

Recipe: This medicinal herb is mostly used in form of a tincture made from a large amount of dried flowers and leaves of this plant, which are left in ethanol for a certain period of time. Compresses made from the fruits of this plant have also been used historically, but nowadays, various types of creams, tinctures, capsules have replaced many traditional methods.

 

 

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